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Upper Valley Orthopaedics
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Medical Articles

What to know about tendinitis
Source: Medical News Today

Tendinitis — also known as tendonitis — is the inflammation of a tendon. It usually happens when a person overuses or injures a tendon during physical activity.

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An Overview of Shoulder Blade Pain
Source: VerywellHealth

Shoulder blade pain doesn't always have an obvious cause. It can be a symptom of something serious like a heart attack or lung cancer. Or maybe you slept on it wrong or have poor posture at the computer.

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Causes of Bottom of Foot Pain and Treatments
Source: VerywellHealth

Your feet are vital shock absorbers. The bottom of your foot strikes the ground with every step. When it hurts, the pain can really disrupt your life.

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Causes and Treatments for Stiff Fingers
Source: Medical News Today

Stiff fingers can be cumbersome, and arthritis or minor injuries are common causes. In some cases, health issues involving the bones, connective tissues, or muscles in the hand are responsible.

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Henry Ford Study Shows Non-Opioids Provide Effective Pain Relief After Knee Surgery
Source: Newswise

A study by Henry Ford Health System published in the October issue of The American Journal of Sports Medicine provides a promising answer to the question “Can patients effectively manage their pain after ACL knee reconstruction surgery without opioids?”

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Increasing dairy intake reduces falls and fractures among older care home residents
Source: Medical Xpress

Increasing intake of foods rich in calcium and protein such as milk, yoghurt, and cheese, reduces falls and fractures in older adults living in residential care, finds a randomised controlled trial published by The BMJ today.

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How you hold your bat, determines your risk of injury
Source: Orthopedics This Week

The use of the palmar hamate grip may increase the risk of hook of the hamate fracture in National Collegiate Athletic Association Division I baseball players, according to new research.

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5 Options for Knee Cartilage Replacement and Repair
Source: Healthline

Advances in orthopedic medicine provide many options for treating knee injuries. Some long-standing approaches include surgery to repair torn cartilage or knee joint replacement. In addition to these, there are now minimally invasive treatments using cartilage taken from elsewhere in the body or regenerated from a person’s own cells.

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Common causes and treatments for a separated shoulder
Source: Verywell Health

A shoulder separation is an injury to the acromioclavicular joint on the top of the shoulder. The shoulder joint is formed at the junction of three bones: the collarbone (clavicle), the shoulder blade (scapula), and the arm bone (humerus). A shoulder separation occurs where the clavicle and the scapula come together.

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Minimally invasive bunionectomy may successfully treat severe hallux valgus deformity
Source: Healio

Third-generation minimally invasive chevron and akin osteotomy demonstrated significant improvements in clinical outcomes and deformity correction in patients with severe hallux valgus,

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7 hand exercises for carpal tunnel syndrome with pictures
Source: Medical News Today

Carpal tunnel syndrome involves the compression of the median nerve in the wrist, which can cause pain and numbness in the hand. Certain hand exercises can help relieve pressure on the median nerve and alleviate symptoms.

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How does rheumatoid arthritis affect the knees?
Source: Medical News Today

Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is an autoimmune condition, meaning the immune system mistakenly attacks healthy tissues. RA in the knees may severely affect a person’s mobility.

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What to expect from physical therapy for hip bursitis
Source: Verywell Health

If you have pain in your hip or hips, you may be suffering from a condition called hip bursitis. Hip bursitis occurs when the small fluid-filled sac, called a bursa, becomes inflamed and irritated on the outside or inner part of your hip. Hip bursitis causes pain, decreased strength, and difficulty with movements like walking or running.

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Why strengthening your hip flexors is important, according to new research
Source: Runner's World

When it comes to strengthening your lower-body muscles that power your running, most runners focus on quads and hamstrings—but are you showing your hip flexors enough love? A recent study in the Archives of Gerontology and Geriatrics suggests that ignoring them could lead to mobility issues as you age.

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What is water on the knee?
Source: Medical News Today

Knee effusion, sometimes called water on the knee, occurs when excess fluid accumulates in or around the knee joint. Common causes include arthritis and injury to the ligaments or meniscus, which is cartilage in the knee.

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Dead arm syndrome: Symptoms, causes, and treatment
Source: Healthline

Dead arm syndrome is a condition that affects the shoulder. It’s caused by repeated movements, which place stress on the joint.

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Swollen feet and ankles: Treatments to try
Source: healthessentials

Have you ever looked down at your ankles and feet and barely recognized them as your own because of swelling? It happens, whether it’s from long days on your feet, hours of travel, surgery or pregnancy.

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What does it feel like to have carpal tunnel syndrome?
Source: healthline

Carpal tunnel syndrome is a condition that affects the hand, wrist, and arm. It happens when the median nerve gets compressed, or squeezed, at the wrist. The median nerve is a large nerve running from the palm to the upper arm.

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MidMichigan Health: Fall prevention strategies
Source: Midland Daily News

Unfortunately, falls are all too common, especially among adults over the age of 65. About one in four adults over the age of 65 experiences a fall, and approximately 95 percent of all hip fractures are related to falls.

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Avoid ‘gamer’s thumb’
Source: Family Safety and Health

Also known as Dequervain’s tenosynovitis, gamer’s thumb is “a condition that causes pain, stiffness and a sensation of pain with thumb and wrist motion,” says the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons.

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Dissecting how pitching affects the glenohumeral joint
Source: Orthopedics This Week

A new study has tackled the subtle, but no less important topic of baseball pitching stressors on the glenohumeral joint. According to the study authors, “Long-term pitching activity changes the stress distribution across the glenohumeral joint surface; however, the influence of competitive level on stress-distribution patterns remains unclear.”

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New study pinpoints two separate mutation near GDF5 gene for osteoarthritis, hip dysplasia
Source: Medical Xpress

The report details regulatory variants found near a gene, which plays a crucial role joint formation called GDF5. The study pinpoints two separate mutations near the gene, one that can cause knee osteoarthritis in older adults and another that can cause hip dysplasia in babies.

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5 knee braces to consider
Source: Medical News Today

Knee braces can provide support to the knee joint. People may find these products beneficial following surgery or injury.

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Pop goes the shoulder now what?
Source: University of Utah Health

If you are worried you have a shoulder dislocation, don’t panic, but do get specialized care right away.

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What Can Bring on Sudden Ankle Pain When You Didnt Injure It?
Source: healthline

You’re strolling along when suddenly a pain shoots through your ankle for no obvious reason. Or perhaps you wake up one morning and your ankle is aching. Without an obvious injury, you might be wondering where the pain came from.

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Assistive Devices: Living Better With Arthritis
Source: WebMD

If you’re living with arthritis, certain assistive devices and changes around your home can help you tackle everyday chores with less pain and move around more easily and safely.

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IT Band Stretches and Treatments to Relieve Knee and Hip Pain
Source: healthessentials

The iliotibial band, or IT band, extends from your hip to your knee along the outside of your thigh. The thick band of connective fibers is the largest piece of fascia in the human body – and often one of the biggest pains for runners and cyclists.

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Elite climbers may develop cartilage abnormalities, osteophytes in finger joints
Source: Healio

Results presented at the Virtual EFORT Congress showed an increase in the occurrence of osteophytes and decrease in cartilage thickness in the distal and proximal interphalangeal joints of elite climbers in a 10-year period.

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How to Ease Back into Exercise Safely After a Long Break
Source: Healthline

After taking a long break from physical activity, most people will not be able to perform at the same level they once did. It’s important to manage expectations and set realistic goals when easing back into exercise after a break.

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What can cause hip pain when sitting?
Source: Medical News Today

Hip pain while sitting can range from mild discomfort to severe. The hip joint may also feel stiff or pop while sitting. Medical conditions, injuries, and incorrect posture can cause hip pain when sitting.

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Nerve Zap` Pain Treatment Could Cut Need for Opioids After Surgeries
Source: HealthDay

An emerging technology could zap your post-op pain away — little or no opioids needed. The technique is called percutaneous peripheral nerve stimulation.

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What to know about bicep tendonitis
Source: Medical News Today

Bicep tendonitis develops when a tendon in the biceps muscle swells and becomes inflamed. It usually occurs with other problems with the shoulder, such as dislocation, impingement, or arthritis.

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Powered prosthetic ankles can restore a wide range of functions for amputees
Source: Science Daily

A recent case study demonstrates that, with training, neural control of a powered prosthetic ankle can restore a wide range of abilities, including standing on very challenging surfaces and squatting. The researchers are currently working with a larger group of study participants to see how broadly applicable the findings may be.

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Overuse can contribute to high rate of arm injuries among youth players
Source: News Medical Life Sciences

With spring baseball season underway, Eric Makhni, M.D., a Henry Ford Health System sports medicine orthopedic surgeon, warns about how overuse can contribute to the high rate of arm injuries among youth players.

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10 exercises for shoulder pain
Source: Medical News Today

Many people experience shoulder pain, but some research suggests that exercise and mobility work may help.

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Tranexamic Acid Shows No Associated Complications in Certain High-Risk Patients
Source: Pharmacy Times

The research is intended to address a knowledge gap on the use of tranexamic acid, a drug that is currently used in the majority of patients undergoing hip and knee replacement surgery. The current study adds weight to the conclusion of smaller prior studies that show there is no evidence suggesting the drug carries more complications in high-risk patients.

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Why Triathletes Should Swim Different Strokes
Source: USMS

Shoulder health is a big deal for swimmers and triathletes. Overuse injuries due to muscular imbalances are common, painful, keep you from training, and can be expensive to treat. Swimming other strokes gives you an opportunity to strengthen other parts of the shoulder by using different movements

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Yoga Moves to Improve Hip Health
Source: AARP

Protect yourself from pain and disability with simple exercises you can do at home

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Knee Pain and Function: Nonoperative Approaches to Managing Patellofemoral Pain Syndrome
Source: Practical Pain Management

Physical rehabilitation and osteopathic manipulative techniques can treat different aspects of “runner’s knee,” to alleviate tight muscles and tender points within the joint or muscle and increase range of motion.

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Don’t let shoulder pain sideline your summer
Source: Cleveland Jewish News

Shoulders are among the most frequently injured joints in the body, with the main culprit stemming from the rotator cuff, the part of the shoulder that allows you to lift and rotate your arms. Over 3 million Americans each year are affected by rotator cuff problems.

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What Surgery Works Best for Advanced Ankle Arthritis?
Source: HealthDay

For patients with severe ankle arthritis, total ankle replacement provides better function over the long haul than the traditional surgical treatment, a new study finds.

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5 Signs of a Thumb Sprain
Source: Handcare

A sprained thumb is an injury to a ligament, which is a soft tissue that connects bones to each other at the joints to keep it stable, as opposed to a thumb fracture (break) which is an injury to the bone. The ulnar collateral ligament is the most injured ligament in the thumb. This particular ligament connects the thumb to the hand on the side closest to your index finger.

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The Top 14 Foods and Supplements for Sports Injuries
Source: healthline

When it comes to sports and athletics, injuries are an unfortunate part of the game. Fortunately, certain foods and supplements may help reduce the amount of time your body needs to recover from a sports injury.

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Hip Dysplasia Risk Factors
Source: Ivanhoe

Hip dysplasia is a condition where a person’s hip socket doesn’t completely cover the ball of one of their thigh bones. It’s usually something you’re born with, but there are some steps you can take to protect your child from developing this condition or making it worse. Ivanhoe reports.

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Physical Therapy For A Pectoralis Major Tear
Source: Verywell Health

A torn or ruptured pectoralis muscle can limit your ability to engage in normal work and recreational activities. It can limit arm use, and may cause significant pain. If you have ruptured or torn your pectoralis major muscle in your chest, you may benefit from physical therapy (PT) to help you recover.

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In Many Cases, Hip Replacement Also Eases Back Pain
Source: HealthDay

If you have a bad hip and lower back pain, a new study suggests that hip replacement surgery may solve both issues at once.

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What Jobs Are Toughest On The Knees?
Source: HealthDay

Based on a review of 71 studies that included nearly one million workers, the riskiest occupations include agriculture, construction, mining, service jobs and housekeeping. And jobs that demand excessive kneeling, squatting, standing, lifting and climbing stairs all increase your odds.

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What You Should Know About Torn Bicep Tendon Injuries
Source: Verywell Health

A biceps tendon injury is a tear or rupture of connective tissue that connects the biceps muscle of the upper arm to bones at either the shoulder (proximal tendon) or elbow (distal tendon). Proximal tears are more common than distal tears and usually are the the result of chronic overuse or an acute injury, such as a direct blow to the shoulder or falling onto an outstretched arm.1

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Study Shows Benefits Of Percutaneous Bunion Correction
Source: Podiatry Today

Can a percutaneous, extra-articular distal first ray osteotomy have an impact for mild and moderate bunion deformities? A recent study in the Journal of Foot and Ankle Surgery involving 217 feet (including 28 simultaneous bilateral cases) says this technique facilitates immediate postoperative weightbearing, minimal complications, reproducible results and application toward both the intermetatarsal and hallux abductus angles.

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Do I Have A Torn Ligament?
Source: ASSH Handcare

A torn ligament can happen in conjunction with a sprained wrist, typically when the wrist is bent backwards forcefully or put into an awkward position. This can happen during any sport such as gymnastics, soccer, football, etc. or simply during a fall. Ligaments are bands of tough connective tissue that connect two bones or hold together a joint.

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Will Your Kid Play School Sports This Fall? Here's Some Guidance On Doing It Safely
Source: Medical Xpress

If you're thinking about letting your child resume sports while the coronavirus pandemic continues to rage, a leading pediatricians' group says there are a few things you should consider.

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Avoid Surgery' For Most Cases Of Common Wrist Fracture In Young People, Urge Researchers
Source: EurekAlert

The SWIFFT trial, funded by the National Institute for Health Research, concludes that for a scaphoid waist fracture in the wrist a plaster cast should be used in the first instance, with surgery only being considered if the bone doesn't heal.

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Exercise as therapy: its surprising potential to treat people with multiple chronic conditions
Source: Medical Xpress

People with multimorbidity want treatments that will improve their physical, mental, emotional, and social health. Our research found that exercise may actually be a surprising treatment for those living with multimorbidity, and offer many of these improvements patients want.

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Hip fracture risk linked to nanoscale bone inflexibility
Source: Science Daily

The study led by Imperial College London found that flexibility, as well as density, in the bone nanostructure is an important factor in assessing how likely someone is to suffer fractures.

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What to know about tightness in the knee
Source: Medical News Today

A feeling of tightness or stiffness in the knee can occur as a result of overuse, injury, or age-related wear and tear.

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The importance of stretching throughout your workday
Source: Medical Xpress

With some gyms closed and a number of people working from home, the COVID-19 pandemic has made it more difficult for many people to get in their daily workout. Sedentary behavior, including sitting for long periods of time, can contribute to adverse health effects

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Lipedema, Fat Ankles, or ‘Cankles’: No Matter What You Call Them, Here’s What You Need to Know
Source: healthline

It lifts a ballet dancer into relevé, absorbs the shock of a runner’s foot striking pavement, and allows a gymnast to stick that landing. Ankles ensure you take every sure-footed step. But what happens when it’s swollen or just bigger than you think it should be?

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What is Raynaud’s Disease?
Source: Handcare

Raynaud’s is known as Raynaud’s disease, Raynaud’s phenomenon and Raynaud’s syndrome. It is a medical condition in which the circulation to your fingertips is interrupted. The fingers, and sometimes toes, will turn pale and white as they have no blood supply. After a while they turn blue, and you may experience discomfort or pain.

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Sprains, Strains? New Guidelines Urge OTC Painkillers, Not Opioids
Source: HealthDay

People with common muscle and joint injuries should skip opioids and instead reach for over-the-counter pain relievers, new treatment guidelines suggest.

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Don’t Let Foot Cramps and Charley Horses Slow You Down
Source: healthessentials

Whether you call it a foot or leg cramp (aka “charley horse”), it’s a common, somewhat mysterious pain that happens when a muscle gets involuntarily stiff and can’t relax.

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For older people and those with chronic health conditions, staying active at home is extra important
Source: Medical Xpress

While we don't know for sure how long our lifestyles will be affected in this way, we do know periods of reduced physical activity can affect our health. Older people and those with chronic conditions are particularly at risk.

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Vitamin D boosts chances of walking after hip fracture
Source: Science Daily

Senior citizens who are not vitamin D deficient have a better chance of walking after hip fracture surgery. The findings suggest that vitamin D deficiency could limit mobility in older adults, according to one of the researchers.

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Better Knee, Better Me™: effectiveness of two scalable health care interventions supporting self-management for knee osteoarthritis – protocol for a randomized controlled trial
Source: BMC Musculoskeletal Disorders

The aim of this study is to compare, in a private health insurance setting, the clinical- and cost-effectiveness of a remotely-delivered, evidence- and theory-informed, behaviour change intervention targeting exercise and self-management (Exercise intervention), with the same intervention plus active weight management (Exercise plus weight management intervention), and with an information-only control group for people with knee osteoarthritis who are overweight or obese.

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Surgical, nonoperative treatment of rotator cuff tears yielded similar outcomes
Source: Healio

Published results showed no significant differences in clinical outcomes at 12 months among patients with acute traumatic rotator cuff tears who received either surgical treatment or nonoperative treatment.

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Remedies for sore feet
Source: Medical News Today

There are several different ways to ease the pain associated with sore feet. Ice packs, over-the-counter pain medications, and rest can all help.

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7 Ways to Test for Tennis Elbow at Home and in Office
Source: Healthline

Tennis elbow, or lateral epicondylitis, develops when the forearm muscles that connect to the outside of your elbow become irritated. This can cause pain and tenderness that’s usually located on the outside (lateral) part of the elbow. There are several simple tests you can do to determine if you have tennis elbow. You can do most of these tests on your own, but a few do require the assistance of a doctor or medical professional.

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Sports Injury Prevention Using the 10 Percent Rule
Source: Verywell Fit

Once you know you can safely exercise the main thing to remember is that you need to progress slowly. The 10 percent rule is a guideline many fitness experts use to help both experts and beginners avoid injury, yet they still see continual improvement in performance.

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What to know about scapular winging
Source: Medical News Today

Scapular winging involves one or both shoulder blades sticking out from the back rather than lying flat. It can happen as a result of injury or nerve damage.

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Causes of Hand Pain and Treatment Options
Source: Verywell Health

The hand is one of the most amazing parts of your body. The complex organization of your hand involves bones, ligaments, tendons, nerves, skin, and other structures that allow your body to perform a complex variety of activities.

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Evidence Behind Injections on the Elbow, Wrist and Hand
Source: Sports Med Review

After reviewing corticosteroid injections of the shoulder region, we will now move distally down the arm and into the elbow, wrist and hand. This article will cover some of the randomized trials and reviews on corticosteroid injections for some of the most common issues that present to a sports medicine practice including lateral and medial epicondylitis, de Quervain’s tenosynovitis, trigger finger, carpal tunnel syndrome.

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Foot and ankle orthopaedic surgeons offer tips for diabetic foot care
Source: Podiatry Canada

November is National Diabetes Month, a time to focus on a disease that affects over 30 million people in the US. The American Orthopaedic Foot & Ankle Society® (AOFAS) raises awareness around the potential foot complications caused by diabetes and offers tips on how to prevent them.

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Many diseases increase the risks of hip fracture surgery
Source: Medical Xpress

Zhaoli Dai, Ph.D., from the Boston University School of Medicine, and colleagues used data from the Osteoarthritis Initiative (OAI) and the Framingham Offspring Osteoarthritis Study to assess how BMI and inflammation might impact the observed association between greater fiber intake and the lower risk for symptomatic knee osteoarthritis.

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Many diseases increase the risks of hip fracture surgery
Source: ScienceDaily

Parkinson's disease, osteoarthritis, rheumatic diseases, alcoholism and mental health disorders increase the risk of surgical complications after a hip fracture surgery, a new study analyzing nationwide registers finds.

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Using Your Own Tissue vs. Donor Graft for ACL Surgery
Source: Verywell Health

Injury to the anterior cruciate ligament is a devastating injury for athletes of all ages. Treatment usually involves surgery. If you undergo surgical reconstruction, you may have to choose between using your own tissue or using a donor graft.

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What Happens With a Quadriceps Tendon Rupture
Source: Verywell Health

The quadriceps tendon is a thick, strong tendon that can withstand tremendous force. In daily life, it acts as part of the extensor mechanism to straighten the knee. People who injure the extensor mechanism may tear the quad tendon, tear the patellar tendon, or fracture the kneecap. All of these injuries have similar treatments and rehabilitation plans.

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Tendonitis and Tendinopathy
Source: Verywell Health

Tendonitis and tendinopathy are not the same things. Knowing the differences will determine your treatment.

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When Is It Safe to Start Running After an Ankle Fracture?
Source: Verywell Health

If you have suffered a fractured ankle and had to have surgery with plates and screws to reduce the fracture, you may wonder when you can return to running.

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What to know about shoulder impingement
Source: Medical News Today

Shoulder impingement, which people sometimes call swimmer’s shoulder, is a condition that causes pain in the shoulder due to a tendon or bursa rubbing against the shoulder blade.

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Causes and treatments for burning in the knee
Source: Medical News Today

Knee joints are under a lot of physical stress each day. It is very common to experience pain in one or both knees due to normal wear and tear, physical activity, or injury. Often, if a person has a knee injury or strain, the pain can feel as though it is burning.

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How to treat hip osteoarthritis
Source: Medical News Today

Osteoarthritis, sometimes called “wear and tear” arthritis, is a common degenerative condition. Doctors can treat osteoarthritis with medication and surgery. People can also manage their symptoms with different exercises and stretches.

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Skiing, Snowboarding Injuries Most Severe Among Younger Kids
Source: US News

Winter sports such as skiing and snowboarding are a great way to get kids active, but new research suggests extra safety measures may be in order for younger children.

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No One-Size-Fits-All for Hydrating During Sports
Source: Health Day

Waiting until you're thirsty to drink during sports could lead to dehydration and poorer performance, a new study finds.

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Depressive symptoms associated with disease severity in patients with knee osteoarthritis
Source: Medical Xpress

The results of a study presented today at the Annual European Congress of Rheumatology (EULAR 2018) demonstrate that among individuals with radiographic knee osteoarthritis (OA), decreased physical performance and greater structural disease severity are associated with a higher risk of experiencing depressive symptoms.

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When Can I Return to Play After an Orthopedic Sports Injury?
Source: US News

Recovery is as unique to the individual as is their genetic makeup – it really does depend on a wide variety of factors. However, for many common orthopedic injuries, there's usually a fairly consistent timeline for return to sport or active living.

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Jymmin: How a combination of exercise and music helps us feel less pain
Source: Science Daily

Pain is essential for survival. However, it could also slow rehabilitation, or could become a distinct disorder. How strongly we feel it depends on our individual pain threshold. Scientists have discovered that this threshold can be increased by a new fitness method called Jymmin. It combines working out on gym machines with free musical improvisation -- and makes us less sensitive towards physical discomfort.

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Total Hip Arthroplasty in Patients With Avascular Necrosis After Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation
Source: Healio

The immunosuppressive regimens required for hematopoietic stem cell transplantation predispose recipients to complications, including avascular necrosis. Cancer-related comorbidities, immunosuppression, and poor bone quality theoretically increase the risk for perioperative medical complications, infection, and implant-related complications in total joint arthroplasty.

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Optimizing range of motion may prevent a stiff knee after TKA
Source: Healio

Knee stiffness following total knee arthroplasty is a rare complication, which is multifactorial and can be prevented with techniques that help optimize knee range of motion, according to a presenter.

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New Procedure May Replace Traditional Hip Replacement Surgery
Source: Healthline Media

Subchondroplasty involves an injection of bone substitute. Advocates say it’s easier, less invasive, and has a quicker recovery time.

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Anatomic press-fit short stem linked with significant clinical improvements after TSA
Source: Healio

Patients who underwent total shoulder arthroplasty with an anatomic press-fit short stem had significant clinical improvements, with few complications and minimal radiographic changes at short-term follow-up, according to results published in The Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery.

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Martial arts can be hazardous to kids
Source: HealthDay

Perhaps there's a black belt in your child's future. But for safety's sake, kids should only engage in noncontact forms of martial arts, a new American Academy of Pediatrics report says.

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Hamstring injuries in baseball may be preventable
Source: Science Daily

Creating a program to prevent hamstring injuries in minor league and major league baseball players might be a possibility say researchers presenting their work today at the American Orthopaedic Society of Sports Medicine's (AOSSM) Annual Meeting in Colorado Springs, CO.

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Study to evaluate outcomes of different hip replacement techniques using mobile gait analysis system
Source: News-medical.net

Researchers at Hospital for Special Surgery (HSS) have launched a pilot study using a portable gait analysis mat to determine early outcomes of several different hip replacement techniques. Gait analysis provides information about the way an individual walks.

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Is traumatic brain injury associated with late-life neurodegenerative conditions?
Source: Medical Xpress

Traumatic brain injury (TBI) with loss of consciousness was not associated with late-life mild cognitive impairment, Alzheimer disease or dementia but it appeared to be associated with increased risk for other neurodegenerative and neuropathologic findings, according to a new article published online by JAMA Neurology.

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Hip Arthroplasty Risk in Men Higher With Increased Dairy Product Consumption
Source: Rheumatology Advisor

Consuming more dairy products may raise the risk for total hip arthroplasty for osteoarthritis (OA) in men, according to a study published in the Journal of Rheumatology.

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Upper Valley Orthopedics – 60 Years Of Combined Orthopedic Expertise
Source: Go Idaho

Whether the patient is a teenage basketball player with a torn ACL or a 76-year old grandmother needing a hip replacement, orthopedic surgeons Michael Larson, Kevin Lee, and Travis Torngren know that most people just want to get back to the life they had before experiencing joint pain.

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Hamstring injuries in baseball may be preventable
Source: Medical Xpress

Creating a program to prevent hamstring injuries in minor league and major league baseball players might be a possibility say researchers presenting their work today at the American Orthopaedic Society of Sports Medicine’s (AOSSM) Annual Meeting in Colorado Springs, CO.

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Non-healing tissue from diabetic foot ulcers reprogrammed as pluripotent stem cells
Source: Medical Xpress

Researchers at Tufts University School of Dental Medicine and the Sackler School of Graduate Biomedical Sciences at Tufts, led by Jonathan Garlick, have established for the first time that skin cells from diabetic foot ulcers can be reprogrammed to acquire properties of embryonic-like cells. These induced pluripotent stem cells might someday be used to treat chronic wounds. The study is published online in advance of print in Cellular Reprogramming.

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